Britain in WW2

May 26, 2015
Second edition

Second edition

 BRITAIN  IN  WW2

     To commemorate the seventieth anniversary of the end of the Second World War, my publishers are launching a second edition of BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 What was life like during the war? (ISBN: 9781504942126 paperback and ISBN: 9781504942133 e-book). It gives a short 33,500 word insight into life in wartime Britain told from the perspective of people who actually experienced it; with an overview of the major campaigns, enlivened by quotations from Churchill’s speeches. How did a family with a small child survive the air raids and rationing?

Life in Britain was harsh, full of drama and the danger of impending death. ‘If a bomb has your name on it, you are dead; if not it will miss you.’ The reader may be surprised at how close the Allies came to disaster. The book’s entertaining insights add interest and will evoke memories for people who lived in those times.

Reviews have said:

‘This book was a relatively quick read – -. James Lingard has meticulously researched and presented the timeline of events for the war, but where this book really shines as far as I am concerned is in the sharing of his own family’s experiences as they were personally impacted. – – Another enjoyable part of the book was the quotes Lingard used at the beginning of each chapter. Many of these quotes were taken from speeches by Churchill or other prominent men of the time and they add to the general picture and emotions of the period.’

‘For the reader who wants to know the facts in a nutshell then read more widely this is the book to read.’

‘History isn’t just about the events that happened, but the impact those events had on the people, on society. I feel history can never be complete unless we see it through the eyes of those it affected, which Lingard does a great job with.

‘The author has researched the subject well and comes up with interesting new facts that even the most accomplished reader of this era will not be aware of.’

‘Great book. A book I could not put down. Not only does it cover the most salient points of the war. We see war in Britain through the eyes of a young child.’

Britain at War 1939 to 1945 new review

May 6, 2015
The author James Lingard tells some of the experiences that he, as a young boy of about 5 or six years old, and his family went through during WWII in England. His first real taste of war was when he and his family returned from a picnic and found that the Anderson shelter in their back yard had been destroyed by a direct bomb hit. If they had been home during the air raid the whole family would surely have been killed.
The family moved several times trying to escape the war but the war seemed to
The author James Lingard tells some of the experiences that he, as a young boy of about 5 or six years old, and his family went through during WWII in England. His first real taste of war was when he and his family returned from a picnic and found that the Anderson shelter in their back yard had been destroyed by a direct bomb hit. If they had been home during the air raid the whole family would surely have been killed.
The family moved several times trying to escape the war but the war seemed to follow them wherever they went.
The author provides an outline, consisting of short paragraphs, which would be a good way for someone not familiar with WWII to quickly review the main battles and turning points of the war.
I liked the book which for me was a quick but overall technical read. I wished the author had included more personal stories.

New Review (5)

May 6, 2015

 

May 05, 2015 Adam Palmer rated Britain at War 1939 to 1945  5 of 5 stars
The author James Lingard tells some of the experiences that he, as a young boy of about 5 or six years old, and his family went through during WWII in England. His first real taste of war was when he and his family returned from a picnic and found that the Anderson shelter in their back yard had been destroyed by a direct bomb hit. If they had been home during the air raid the whole family would surely have been killed.
The family moved several times trying to escape the war but the war seemed to
The author James Lingard tells some of the experiences that he, as a young boy of about 5 or six years old, and his family went through during WWII in England. His first real taste of war was when he and his family returned from a picnic and found that the Anderson shelter in their back yard had been destroyed by a direct bomb hit. If they had been home during the air raid the whole family would surely have been killed.
The family moved several times trying to escape the war but the war seemed to follow them wherever they went.
The author provides an outline, consisting of short paragraphs, which would be a good way for someone not familiar with WWII to quickly review the main battles and turning points of the war.
I liked the book which for me was a quick but overall technical read. I wished the author had included more personal stories.

Book of the month

May 4, 2015

BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war? has excellent reviews from UCL People (University College London) and The Historical Association – a British charity for teachers. It gives a short 33,000 word insight into the harsh realities of life in Britain with an overview of the major campaigns in World War 2, enlivened by personal experiences and quotations from Churchill\’s speeches. A recent reviewer wrote: ‘For the reader who wants to know the facts in a nutshell then read more widely this is the book to read. Highly recommended.’

The book was runner up to a fantasy novel in the May book of the month run by the Goodreads Group ‘Books, blogs, authors and more’.

 

New Review (4)

April 7, 2015

James Lingard’s Britain at War 1939 to 1945 has received a further 5 star review from Hawaii. This reads:

The Hook: Britain during the WWII

I received a copy of this book from the author, through LibraryThing, in exchange for an honest review.

As as student of European History, you can see why this appealed to me. And I received this copy during my studies of Western Civilization so this was bonus material for me.

And I wasn’t disappointed.

Before I get into it, let me be clear that I did not read this book to fact check. I read this book to gain insight to what life was like in Europe, and in this case Britain, during the war. It was before my time, you see, and I am curious enough to want to have an idea of what it may have been like. I have an idea of how WWII impacted Hawaii, but this is Europe. And it is in this sense that Lingard has offered a valuable perspective.

I like the way the book is organized. It’s a timeline of events, but it’s in a format I like and understand. Chapter 1 being about pre-war life, Chapter 18 about the victory, and everything in between. It’s easy to follow which makes it easy to tag reference points–an item of importance to those of us who love to take notes. We do a lot of that so we can reread things, process things, and eventually form our opinion of things, backed by the evidence we’ve tagged and noted.

I also like that this accounting of events are told from the perspective of someone who actually experienced events. I’ve heard some accounts of WWII in Hawaii from my grandmother and I love those stories because it’s coming from someone who actually witnessed the aftermath. It’s the same feel with this book. As mentioned in the first line of the introduction:

As far as possible, this history of the Second World War is written from the standpoint of people actually involved.

And if you didn’t know, that’s a historian’s weakness. We’re a sucker for primary resources and this book can be put into that category. It’s first witness account of the chain of events that is World War II.

The flow of information reads like a journal, which I love. The text doesn’t get too heavy where you need to reread a paragraph a few times to process it correctly. Lingard has also taken what can be a dense subject and presents it in a way that the reader can easily grasp the idea of what it may have been like during this period in time.

In my opinion, Lingard accomplishes what he set out to do: to give the reader an idea of what living in Britain was like during the Second World War. He covers the progression of the war throughout Europe and told from the perspective of a Britain resident. This knowledge, coupled with my recent studies of Western Civilization, has provided a well-rounded perspective of WWII history. History isn’t just about the events that happened, but the impact those events had on the people, on society. I feel history can never be complete unless we see it through the eyes of those it affected, which Lingard does a great job with.

Overall, I’m glad to have this book in my library and would recommend it to anyone who wants to learn anything about history, especially what life during WWII may have been like. Thank you, James, for providing this perspective.

New Review (3)

March 31, 2015

Another 5 star review by Jane of Britain at War 1939 to 1945 by James Lingard. She writes:

“I was asked to read this book through http://www.librarything.com.

I have read a great deal on Britain and the part so many people played during this time. I had just finished the Longest Night by Gavin Mortimer and was interested to read how the author could condense this into one book.

The author did manage to condense this and really well. I have given this book five stars.

I was really interested in the author’s family and Hebden Bridge West Yorkshire during the war as I have fond memories of Heptonstall and Hebden Bridge some twenty years ago, which today is even more colourful and bohemian. But back then these were essentially weaver’s towns.

The author has researched the subject well and comes up with interesting new facts that even the most accomplished reader of this era will not be aware of.

For the reader who wants to know the facts in a nutshell then read more widely this is the book to read.

Highly recommended and thank you for the opportunity to read this fascinating book.

New Review (2)

March 6, 2015

Another 5 star review on Amazon US reads:

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Britain at War 1939 to 1945., March 6, 2015
By
Pennie Mae Cartawick. Author of the Sherlock Holmes book series “Pennie Mae Cartawick”
This review is from: Britain at War 1939 to 1945:What was life like during the war? (Kindle Edition)
James Lingard is a native to London, England. Although I have lived in Florida over half my life, I was born and raised in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. My father served in the second world war as an Airplane Engineer, and I had heard many stories about that time era through him. My mother served in the land army at that time. Both of my parents had first hand knowledge about bomb shelters, food rationing and unspeakable death and the harsh conditions they had to endure as young adults. They passed down to us children just how their lives were effected through it.

‘Britain at War 1939 to 1945′ is a brief history of that time era that hit home not that long ago. The author, James Lingard paints a vivid picture of those days through his own eyes as a small boy growing up in England. A cruel environment of dangerous and intimate detail of historical tragedy. involving experiences from people who saw those times with tormented memories that do not go forgotten. I’m sure it couldn’t have been easy to put pen to paper for James to revive those days, but through his memoirs of what he endured as a child, brings the readers closer to powerful and meaningful events.

New Review

March 2, 2015

Laurence Stephenson reviewed BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war?

‘Great book. A book I could not put down. Not only does it cover the most salient points of the war. We see war in Britain through the eyes of a young child. I found the fathers philosophical view of death very refreshing. Mr James Lingard thank you.

Even though I am in Australia and was born after the war, in my early years at school I remember the teacher telling us how people in England were having trouble procuring enough food due to rationing, and being asked to donate money to send food parcels to England.

Thanks for a good read.’

Britain at War 1939 to 1945 Home Front

January 23, 2015

A reader of Lingards Britain at War has commented:
“I most enjoyed the parts of this book where the author focused on his family and their experiences during the war. Lingard started school soon after the war began, so he was a young boy at the time. I found the information about rationing, bomb shelters, and unpredictable train schedules interesting. I think the most memorable part of the book was young Lingard on the beach (his home was destroyed by a bomb, so the family moved near the coast where their father had some work before he joined the Army), waving to a German pilot who was doing photo reconnaissance. Some of the locals thought he was signaling the enemy, but he was just a little boy waving at an airplane. Later his mother tried to take him to the beach again, but the beach was off limits, covered in barbed wire and mines.
This book would be a good choice for readers interested in a big-picture summary of the war before delving into more detailed books on more specific parts of the war.”

Britain at War

January 21, 2015

Librarything has posted:
BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war? by James Lingard (Authorhouse) Offered by Jamesbat (author)
The book has recently been re-launched in view of excellent reviews. I would value the opinions of the reading public as well as established historians.
Description: BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war? paperback (ISBN 9781434359339) and ebook (ISBN 9781434359346)
This book offered for review is an eBook, not a physical book.
Recipient is asked to provide a review in exchange for this book.
The book is a short 33,000 word insight into the horrors of the Home Front with an overview of the major campaigns in World War 2, enlivened by personal experiences and quotations from Churchill. It makes the history available in a readable and interesting form, providing a fascinating look at the harsh realities of life in Britain – life full of drama and the danger of impending death. ‘If a bomb has your name on it, you are dead; in not, it will miss you.’ How did a family with a small child caught up in such a war survive? The facts and figures are historically accurate rather than the propaganda then fed to the public.

In a recent 5star review, Bev Walkling writes:
‘I confess that I am fascinated by the Second World War, in part because my father and various uncles served as members of the Canadian forces and their experiences impacted me as I was growing up. As such, this book was of great fascination to me.
This book was a relatively quick read that would be of interest to those who might not have much background in the events of the war or those who know the broad details but want the day to day understanding of how lives were affected by things like bombing raids. James Lingard has meticulously researched and presented the timeline of events for the war, but where this book really shines as far as I am concerned is in the sharing of his own family’s experiences as they were personally impacted. Though only a young boy when the war began, his life was affected in multiple ways and his family was at one point thought killed as their air raid shelter was destroyed. In actual fact they had gone out to the woods for an outing, which ultimately saved their lives!
Another enjoyable part of the book was the quotes Lingard used at the beginning of each chapter. Many of these quotes were taken from speeches by Churchill or other prominent men of the time and they add to the general picture and emotions of the period.
I would recommend this book to individuals ranging from young adults through to seniors.
» Publisher information


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