THE CAUCASUS CAULDRON by James Lingard

October 26, 2020

THE CAUCASUS CAULDRON, a thriller by James Lingard, is now available from Amazon as an eBook and a paperback. The background seems in danger of being reflected in the current crisis enveloping Nagorno-Karabakh.
The BLURB reads:
MI6 spies; Russian FSB; Chechen terrorists; Abkhaz Separatists; the 1992 Georgian war.
This breath-taking and brutal novel is a gripping tale set in the magnificent Caucasus Mountains during Georgia’s ill-fated invasion of Abkhazia in 1992. The Caucasus Cauldron gives a vivid focus to a historical moment left out of the history books, a world ripping itself apart and ravaged by never ending hatred and blood feuds.
Can our hero, Mac, trust the attractive Russian FSB officer, Kris, who befriends him and how will she react to Doctor Anna, a Separatist rabble rouser who holds the key to his secret mission? And what about the mysterious Sergei, a former British agent who seems to have disappeared?
How will Mac cope with the Chechen terrorist who has vowed to kill him? ‘You are a dead man, English. We know who you are; you are spying on our people. Now you die.’
The result is an intense action packed thriller full of danger, death and fear but a story full of quiet humour and surprising twists and turns.


Details are available at :- https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07YMZHKS9 https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07YMZHKS9

#military #war #spy #terrorist #Georgia #Russia #novel #thriller

THE CAUCASUS CAULDRON

October 23, 2020

The publishers are about to release my new thriller, THE CAUCASUS CAULDRON. They intend to launch it as an eBook, followed by an audiobook and a paperback.

The BLURB reads:

MI6 spies; Russian FSB; Chechen terrorists; Abkhaz Separatists; the 1992 Georgian war.

This breath-taking and brutal novel is a gripping tale set in the magnificent Caucasus Mountains during Georgia’s ill-fated invasion of Abkhazia in 1992. The Caucasus Cauldron gives a vivid focus to a historical moment left out of the history books, a world ripping itself apart and ravaged by never ending hatred and blood feuds.

Can our hero, Mac, trust the attractive Russian FSB officer, Kris, who befriends him and how will she react to Doctor Anna, a Separatist rabble rouser who holds the key to his secret mission? And what about the mysterious Sergei, a former British agent who seems to have disappeared?

How will Mac cope with the Chechen terrorist who has vowed to kill him? ‘You are a dead man, English. We know who you are; you are spying on our people. Now you die.’

The result is an intense action packed thriller full of danger, death and fear but a story full of quiet humour and surprising twists and turns.

***

James Lingard

CORONA VIRUS INSOLVENCY LAW REFORMS

October 16, 2020

The purpose of this note is not to summarize the reforms but to examine their practical effect.

The ipso facto provisions

Section 14 of the Corporate Insolvency and Government Act 2020 enacts:

S 14(3) A provision of a contract enabling the supplier to terminate supply or to ‘do any other thing’, because the company becomes subject to the relevant insolvency procedure, ceases to have effect.

S 14(4) Where under the provision of a contract the supplier is entitled to terminate supply in reliance of an event prior to the insolvency period, the entitlement may not be exercised during that period.

 S 14(7) prohibits making it a condition of further supply that outstanding charges are paid.

What happens if the supplier simply regards the contract as frustrated by the insolvency and ceases to make further deliveries, perhaps due to ‘production problems’? On learning of the insolvency, a prudent supplier would appreciate that its customer is likely at best to downsize and reduce its orders and so adjust production accordingly.

Even if failure to deliver legally makes the supplier liable for breach of contract, can the insolvent company survive if supplies are withheld? Can it afford to litigate the niceties of the legal doctrine of frustration? In practice, if further supplies are required, a new contract should set out the terms, perhaps charging a higher price in view of the increased risk of non-payment but avoiding infringing S 14(7).

In the past, experienced insolvency practitioners have made it a priority to negotiate with essential suppliers and this is likely to continue. Waiting for the next delivery would be a mistake.

Wrongful Trading

S 12(1) enacts:

In determining, for the purposes of section 214 of the Insolvency Act 1986 (liability of director for wrongful trading) the contribution to a company’s assets that it is proper for a person to make, the court is to assume that the person is not responsible for any worsening of the financial position of the company or its creditors that occurs during the relevant period.

S 214 enacts that a director of an insolvent company can be personally liable to make such contribution to its assets as the court thinks proper if he ought to have concluded that there was no reasonable prospect that the company would avoid going into insolvent liquidation and failed to take every step with a view to minimising the potential loss to the company’s creditors as he ought to have taken.

S 12 does not repeal the wrongful trading section, it merely requires the court to assume the person is not responsible for any worsening of the company’s position during the relevant period.

Is the assumption still to apply if the defendant manifestly acted irresponsibly or is it rebuttable? The court can look at conduct prior to the relevant period.

In any event, if the directors ought to have realised that their action was likely to cause loss to creditors, they will be in breach of their duty to act in the interest of creditors. This duty under the Companies Act 2006 S172, arises when they know or should know that the company is or is likely to become insolvent. In this context, “likely” means probable (BIT v Sequana), a test shortly to be reviewed by the Supreme Court. ‘Insolvent’ means unable to pay its debts as they fall due or its liabilities exceed its assets, contingent and future liabilities being treated realistically.

The need to file audited accounts is temporarily suspended. Auditors value assets on the basis that a business is a going concern. When this ceases to be so, heavy write downs of stock and book debts are required.

It is fraudulent trading to incur credit  knowing that there is no prospect of being able to pay the debt when it falls due, even if there might be a distant prospect in the future. This constitutes intent to defraud (R v Grantham).

Directors who believe their company has reasonable prospects of avoiding insolvency should prepare business plans showing how they intend to continue trading.

If rescue efforts fail, insolvency practitioners will examine transactions at an undervalue, voidable preferences and the other insolvency remedies which still apply.

James Lingard

#corona virus #insolvency #rescues #law #reform

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED

October 7, 2020

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED is a fact based historical novel. Britain in the 1930s; a novel inspired by real events; eloping; WW2. It is a moving love story about one woman’s enduring resilience, a story full of quiet humour and surprising twists and turns, set against the background of wartime Britain.

Emily falls passionately in love with working class Walter, despite fierce opposition from her class conscious father. She resolves to elope to escape such a male dominated society. However, her married life becomes fractured by World War 2.

The new book was prompted by some reviewers of my nonfiction history book, BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 (What was life during the war?), who expressed disappointment that it did not cover the periods before and after the war.

The new book is closely fact based on the life of my mother, Emily, but categorized as historical fiction because it contains considerable dialogue and covers the pre-war period before I was born. I am the Richard in the story. From 1940 onwards, I write from personally having experienced what took place including a number of near death dramas.

Details of the book are at:- https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07YMZHKS9 https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07YMZHKS9 The book has been featured in sixteen blogs including Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo blog at https://wp.me/p1wss8-mS0

#historicalfiction #historicalromance #WW2homefront #bookstoread #romance #booklovers #whattoread #suspenceromance #VJ Day.

James Lingard

BATTLE OF BRITAIN EIGHTIETH ANNIVERSARY

September 14, 2020

Eighty years ago today on 14th September 1940, the German air force stopped attacking British airfields and the Blitz of London began. The initial attacks on the docks went largely unopposed as the Allies devoted their resources to defending airfields. This encouraged the Luftwaffe to repeat their strategy which they did for the next fifty seven nights.

German intelligence had inflated British losses over the past weeks and reported the destruction of airfields in the south east of England. In consequence, they believed that the RAF had few fighters left in a serviceable condition. After dark on the 15th September, a heavy raid was followed by a second force of over one hundred bombers with a fighter escort which expected only light resistance.

This time they were met for the first time by spitfires and hurricanes based to the north of London. Five squadrons assembled themselves into a big wing which attacked en masse with devastating consequences then pursued the retreating enemy to such good effect that only a few planes made it back to France.

Such losses were dismissed by the German High Command which repeated the raids over the following nights with similarly disastrous consequences. The British fighters also suffered some losses but these were almost equaled by new planes coming off the production lines and flown to the squadrons which needed them. Replacing pilots shot down with others of equal experience became a problem but some parachuted to safety and returned to the fray.

By mid-November German losses in the air were such that Hitler abandoned his plan to invade Britain and began to think of invading his ally, the Soviet Union, a mistake which cost him the war and ultimately his life.

Readers interested to know what life in Britain was like during such a perilous period are referred to THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED by James Lingard. Details of the book are at:- https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07YMZHKS9  or https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07YMZHKS9

#WW2 #Home front #whattoread #history #Britainatwar

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED – ELOPING

September 10, 2020

This is an extract from THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED by James Lingard

Emily did not sleep at all that night; she worried about whether her decision to elope had been sensible. What if her father was right and her motor cycle boyfriend proved to be rough with her or unreliable? Did she really know him, after all they had never actually slept together?

As midnight passed she dismissed such heresy and told herself: ’I need to be awake and ready to leave when my Jimmy arrives. If I fail him, I might be forced to marry Lionel – imagine that huge, repulsive man forcing himself upon me!’ She shuddered and her thoughts returned to the more urgent preparations for her journey. ‘My first priority must be to pack all my essentials into a knapsack.’

That proved more difficult than she expected; it took over an hour agonising over what to take and what to leave, there would be no second chance to recover anything which she forgot. ‘Time now to say goodbye to my childhood collection of dolls and family photographs, before consigning them to a cupboard. A shame I shall never see them again but it can’t be helped.’

She checked and rechecked a list of what she needed and what must be done. ‘Too much clobber, do I really need to take any books? I can always buy another copy of Alice in Wonderland. What have I done with my hair brush?’

‘Should I leave a note or simply disappear? If I don’t, the police will spend hours looking for me; but if I do and the note is found before we’re married, the result could be disastrous. Then again, what should I write?’ In the end, she decided it would be safer to do nothing.

At four o’clock in the morning, she dressed in her travelling clothes and thought for the hundredth time about how she might leave the house without being heard. ‘I must take more care with my make up; my Jimmy needs to see me looking at my best.’

Her original idea of knotting the sheets from her bed together and climbing out of the bedroom window lost its appeal when she opened it and looked out. A full moon in a clear sky promised a fine dry day ahead, but also brightly lit the entire street below. To her horror, she spotted the local policeman patrolling down the road.

‘Knotted sheets hanging from a window will attract his attention and he’ll raise the alarm. My father knows the Chief Constable and he’ll have Jimmy arrested for abducting me if I’m caught with him. It’s no good; I’ll have to creep out through the front door and pray that nobody hears me.’

She kept looking at her watch but time seemed to stand still. Perhaps Walter would come early? She began to peep out of the window every few minutes, but the empty street only made her start biting her nails and she knew that would spoil them.

At last 4.30 am arrived and when she looked out of the window, there he stood across the street looking up anxiously towards her bedroom; her Jimmy – waiting for her just as he promised. Filled with a new energy, she opened the sash window enough to give him a cheery wave and blow him a kiss. No sign of the policeman. As soon as he saw her, he gave an enormous grin and waved back. A rush of relief swept through her; Walter at last – time to act.

She opened her bedroom door inch by inch and peeped out just as the toilet flushed in the bathroom at the end of the landing. A quick look revealed her parents’ bedroom door to be wide open, so she ducked back into her room and closed the door softly, her heart beating fast – shaken at the narrow escape.

Hearing her father return to bed, she grabbed her knapsack and crept out of the bedroom, tip-toeing across the landing and down the stairs. ‘I must avoid the seventh step which always creaks. Now, where on earth is the front door key? No, not in its usual place in the drawer of the small table next to the hat stand. But we always keep it there!’

She wasted precious time hunting for the key, before deciding that perhaps her father had removed it deliberately. ‘Hell, am I locked into the house? I’m going to have to trade my dignity for freedom and climb through a window – – perhaps the key to the kitchen door is still in the drawer next to the sink.’

Footsteps above caused her to skid to a halt in the hallway; to her dismay they seemed to be moving towards the stairs. She dashed through the partly-open lounge door, hid behind the settee and peeped out, just in time to see her father in his dark blue dressing gown walking by.

Moments seemed like hours as she waited in the dark. ‘Did he hear me leave the bedroom despite all the care I took? Is he looking for me?’ then the sound of running water: ‘What a relief, he only wants a glass of water,’ she sighed.

Emily waited breathlessly until the sound of heavy footsteps going up the stairs told her she could now safely run into the kitchen, and let herself out of the back door. The key lay invitingly on the tiled work top but as she struggled with both hands to undo the stiff top bolt, her knapsack slipped off the table and knocked off a cup which smashed onto the floor.

Did anyone hear? She listened intently, from above came the sound of her father’s voice: ‘I heard a noise downstairs. You stay here in bed whilst I see if everything is locked up properly.’ She gritted her teeth: ‘What am I going to do? If I run for it, he’ll chase after me or worse call the police and have Walter arrested. — Don’t panic; take the key with you and lock the door from the outside.’

Running through the cool leafy garden around to the side alleyway and through the front gate, she fell into her lover’s arms and pulled him out of sight of the house. She took a step back, looked at her Jimmy, smiled and kissed him then kissed him again and again passionately. ‘I’ve escaped! I really have, but father’s suspicious, we must get away from here.’ He grabbed her hand and together they ran down the street, Emily could almost feel the adrenalin pumping in her veins at the excitement of what they were about to do.

When they turned the corner into the next street, Jimmy explained to her: ‘I’ve brought dad’s car; it’s over there’. Emily saw a black Austin Cambridge saloon parked on the other side of the road. ‘It’s less conspicuous and quieter than the motorbike,’ he added breathlessly.

As Walter drove back to Hebden Bridge, he explained: ‘In the absence of your parents, my Dad will be giving you away at the church. He likes you, but it’s me that you are marrying! I don’t want any last minute change of mind.’ Emily giggled; finally all their carefully made plans were falling into place.

*   *   *

V J DAY

August 15, 2020

On this the 75th anniversary of the end of World War 2, it is appropriate to reflect on what life was like in those far away brutal times. To present day generations that war may seem to be just history but it fundamentally changed the world for all of us.

Back then, Britain was an Imperial power with an Empire on which the sun never set including India, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia and numerous colonies sprinkled around the globe. She boasted an army of over a million men, a powerful navy and a strong air force, all of which entitled her to a seat at the Yalta Conference alongside the United States of America and Russia.

 So what went wrong? The war had exhausted Britain and drained it of money; India and the other Dominions demanded independence as the price for their assistance during the war and all available resources were devoted to repairing war-damaged houses and other buildings. Rationing continued due to lack of funds to import food.

Post war British Governments failed to recognise the full extent of the change in her circumstances. They continued to impose two years national service in the armed forces on young men and fought numerous wars in Korea, Palestine, Greece and elsewhere (but not Vietnam).

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED by James Lingard has now been released by Wordwooze as an audiobook in time for the 75th anniversary of VJ Day.

It vividly tells the story of my mother’s elopement and our life in various British locations during the war, life full of drama and the danger of death. It is a moving love story about one woman’s enduring resilience, a story full of quiet humour and surprising twists and turns.

‘Wow! What a good book’ (Goodreads reviewer)

‘James brought their lives to life’ (Library Thing reviewer)

Details of the book are at:-

#historicalfiction #historicalromance #WW2homefront #bookstoread #romance #booklovers #whattoread #suspenceromance #VJ Day.

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED AUDIOBOOK

August 6, 2020

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED by James Lingard has at last been released by Wordwooze as an audiobook in time for the 75th anniversary on 15th August of the end of World War 2.

It vividly tells the story of my mother’s elopement and our life in various British locations during the war, life full of drama and the danger of death. It is a moving love story about one woman’s enduring resilience, a story full of quiet humour and surprising twists and turns.

‘Wow! What a good book’ (Goodreads reviewer)

‘James brought their lives to life’ (Library Thing reviewer)

Details of the book are at:-

#historicalfiction #historicalromance #bookstoread #romance #booklovers #whattoread #suspenceromance

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED on READING GATEWAY

April 14, 2020

My interview on Reading Gateway reads:-

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED a fact based historical novel Britain in the 1930s; a novel inspired by real events; eloping; WW2. Emily falls passionately in love with working class Walter, despite fierce opposition from her class conscious father. She sees marriage as a partnership of equals and resolves to elope to escape such a male dominated society. Emily’s actions will see her struggle to survive the subsequent devastation brought about by the war, as she and her four year old son are thrown into the midst of danger and death. The family experience rationing and the terror of bombing. Their air raid shelter is destroyed by a direct hit. When Walter volunteers for the army, Emily and her son are evacuated to a rat infested cottage in a farming community near Hebden Bridge. The war changes Walter into an efficient army officer who demands to be obeyed. Emily worries that she might have a rival for his affections. How can she restore their loving relationship?

James Lingard comes from the serious inner workings of deep cerebral thought. He grew up in Hebden Bridge/Keighley Yorkshire in England, and his most formative years were spent at Dulwich College, a boarding school. It should not surprise you to learn his factual nature led him to practice Insolvency and Banking Law where during the course of the interview, he perked up at the very notion of addressing the state of a business. Is the business salvageable and are the employees still working?

He began writing at twenty when he published his first magazine article. It was a thrill seeing his writing in print and from that point he developed a love for it. He spent a long legal career writing legal briefs and books, among which is Lingard’s Bank Security Documents (LexisNexis Butterworths). When he retired, he decided to try something a bit different. Novels were a challenge and his first didn’t fair well commercially, but it led him to write the book THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED which is 90% fact based.

James loves history from the 19th century, but most of all he loves retirement. THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED can be purchased on Amazon.com.

James Lingard

THE GIRL WHO DISAPPEARED new review

April 10, 2020

Jane rated it really liked it ****
I was asked to review by Lovereading.co.uk

I was interested as Emily lived in Halifax West Yorkshire – having lived in Halifax and Heptonstall I was drawn to this. This is in the 30s – very strict father and she wants to marry Walter but as you guess the father is not consenting. Nasty man but Emily in intent and a war is looming. She set sail for a honeymoon in the States.

Desire is to get married. They are enjoying life together until they get caught up in Britain in WW II. Then the bombs start falling in Britain and story is told by Emily and the female side of the war. Really interesting story of life in world war 2

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