Archive for January, 2015

Britain at War 1939 to 1945 Home Front

January 23, 2015

A reader of Lingards Britain at War has commented:
“I most enjoyed the parts of this book where the author focused on his family and their experiences during the war. Lingard started school soon after the war began, so he was a young boy at the time. I found the information about rationing, bomb shelters, and unpredictable train schedules interesting. I think the most memorable part of the book was young Lingard on the beach (his home was destroyed by a bomb, so the family moved near the coast where their father had some work before he joined the Army), waving to a German pilot who was doing photo reconnaissance. Some of the locals thought he was signaling the enemy, but he was just a little boy waving at an airplane. Later his mother tried to take him to the beach again, but the beach was off limits, covered in barbed wire and mines.
This book would be a good choice for readers interested in a big-picture summary of the war before delving into more detailed books on more specific parts of the war.”

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Britain at War

January 21, 2015

Librarything has posted:
BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war? by James Lingard (Authorhouse) Offered by Jamesbat (author)
The book has recently been re-launched in view of excellent reviews. I would value the opinions of the reading public as well as established historians.
Description: BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war? paperback (ISBN 9781434359339) and ebook (ISBN 9781434359346)
This book offered for review is an eBook, not a physical book.
Recipient is asked to provide a review in exchange for this book.
The book is a short 33,000 word insight into the horrors of the Home Front with an overview of the major campaigns in World War 2, enlivened by personal experiences and quotations from Churchill. It makes the history available in a readable and interesting form, providing a fascinating look at the harsh realities of life in Britain – life full of drama and the danger of impending death. ‘If a bomb has your name on it, you are dead; in not, it will miss you.’ How did a family with a small child caught up in such a war survive? The facts and figures are historically accurate rather than the propaganda then fed to the public.

In a recent 5star review, Bev Walkling writes:
‘I confess that I am fascinated by the Second World War, in part because my father and various uncles served as members of the Canadian forces and their experiences impacted me as I was growing up. As such, this book was of great fascination to me.
This book was a relatively quick read that would be of interest to those who might not have much background in the events of the war or those who know the broad details but want the day to day understanding of how lives were affected by things like bombing raids. James Lingard has meticulously researched and presented the timeline of events for the war, but where this book really shines as far as I am concerned is in the sharing of his own family’s experiences as they were personally impacted. Though only a young boy when the war began, his life was affected in multiple ways and his family was at one point thought killed as their air raid shelter was destroyed. In actual fact they had gone out to the woods for an outing, which ultimately saved their lives!
Another enjoyable part of the book was the quotes Lingard used at the beginning of each chapter. Many of these quotes were taken from speeches by Churchill or other prominent men of the time and they add to the general picture and emotions of the period.
I would recommend this book to individuals ranging from young adults through to seniors.
» Publisher information

New website

January 18, 2015

My World War 2 website is now live at http://www.lingardsbritainatwar.com./
BRITAIN AT WAR 1939 to 1945 what was life like during the war? has been re-launched in view of excellent reviews from UCL People (University College London) (March 2009) and The Historical Association – a British charity for teachers and other academics.
It gives a short 33,000 word insight into the horrors of the Home Front with an overview of the major campaigns in World War 2, enlivened by personal experiences and quotations from Churchill. Available as an e-book or paperback, it was written to make the history available to the public in a readable and interesting form.

In a recent 5star review, Bev Walkling writes:
‘I received this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review.

I confess that I am fascinated by the Second World War, in part because my father and various uncles served as members of the Canadian forces and their experiences impacted me as I was growing up. As such, this book was of great fascination to me.

This book was a relatively quick read that would be of interest to those who might not have much background in the events of the war or those who know the broad details but want the day to day understanding of how lives were affected by things like bombing raids. James Lingard has meticulously researched and presented the timeline of events for the war, but where this book really shines as far as I am concerned is in the sharing of his own family’s experiences as they were personally impacted. Though only a young boy when the war began, his life was affected in multiple ways and his family was at one point thought killed as their air raid shelter was destroyed. In actual fact they had gone out to the woods for an outing, which ultimately saved their lives!

Another enjoyable part of the book was the quotes Lingard used at the beginning of each chapter. Many of these quotes were taken from speeches by Churchill or other prominent men of the time and they add to the general picture and emotions of the period.

I would recommend this book to individuals ranging from young adults through to seniors and on Goodreads to those in the History Book Club and the World War 2 Group.

Tags:Battle of Britain, Churchill, D-day, history, home front, military, world war 2


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